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TrafFix begins second expansion in as many years

ANDY HALLMAN/Ledger photo

TrafFix Devices Inc. is building a 17,000-square-foot expansion onto its manufacturing plant in Fairfield. Ground was broken a few weeks ago, and construction is expected to finish in December.
ANDY HALLMAN/Ledger photo TrafFix Devices Inc. is building a 17,000-square-foot expansion onto its manufacturing plant in Fairfield. Ground was broken a few weeks ago, and construction is expected to finish in December.

TrafFix Devices Inc. of Fairfield completed one big expansion last year, and is following that with a second one this year.

The business grew by 80,000 square feet during an expansion in late 2017-early 2018. The concrete barely had time to settle on that project when the business embarked on another, this time a 17,000-square-foot addition to its roto mold facility.

TrafFix Devices broke ground a few weeks ago, and as of this morning, bulldozers were busy moving dirt into place. The expansion is expected to be complete by December.

Jim Marshall, the company’s vice president of marketing, said the current expansion will house two roto mold machines, bringing the total number at the plant to four. He said it will allow the company to manufacture more of its existing barrier wall products and new ones which have been developed for markets around the world.

“TrafFix Devices continues to grow as a supplier of traffic control equipment and crash attenuators,” Marshall said. “We are gaining market share due to our high quality reputation, and there is significant amount of road and bridge repair going on in the United States. Many of our products are used to delineate and protect workers in the construction work zones needed to complete the road and bridge repairs.”

Marshall hinted that the expansion will lead to the creation of more jobs. He said the company is always looking for good employees, and that with its continued growth, more people will be needed to fulfill work orders.

TrafFix Devices is a global company. Its headquarters are in San Clemente, California, and it has manufacturing plants not just in Fairfield but also in Adelanto, California, and Tijuana, Mexico.

The Ledger asked Marshall if the company is expanding its other manufacturing plants, too.

“Our other plants are very busy as well, however, we have seen the greatest need to expand our Fairfield facility because the products that are manufactured in Fairfield are in high demand,” he said.

Fairfield Economic Development Association executive director Joshua Laraby spoke about how TrafFix is a great local success story. It was one of three businesses that began in the late 1980s in what was then FEDA’s speculative building.

“They’ve grown from an 8,000 square-foot incubator space to now operating in just under 190,000 square feet and employing over 100 people in Fairfield,” he said. “Founder and President Jack Kulp regularly shares his gratitude for the support of Fairfield with [the company’s] continuous growth plans.”

The other two businesses that got their start in FEDA’s speculative building are H&H Mold and Tooling Inc., and Fairfield Industries, formerly known as Fairfield Agricultural Products. Both companies have constructed facilities of their own in the West Industrial Park and grown their employee base.